From the June 2009 issue of Treasury & Risk magazine

2009 100 Most Influential People in Finance

The worldwide financial crisis is top of mind as we present our 2009 list of the 100 Most Influential People in Finance.

The subprime meltdown that started to seep like acid through the economy last spring erupted into a full-blown global affliction in September and has dominated all discourse and commerce ever since. So it is no surprise that the worldwide financial crisis is top of mind as we present our 2009 list of the 100 Most Influential People in Finance. Treasury & Risk's pick of the first among equals (the rest are in no particular order) this year is:

SHEILA BAIR, CHAIRMAN, U.S. FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP. (FDIC)
Bair was one of the first high-ranking government officials to sound the alarm about the subprime crisis, back in October of 2007. She has also been one of the most aggressive advocates for mortgage relief.

At the height of the crisis last October, when Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson, Fed chairman Ben Bernanke and New York Fed president Timothy Geithner closed ranks to support the Bush administration's $700 trillion bailout plan, Bair, 55, a Kansas Republican appointed by President Bush in 2006, was an outspoken critic of the administration's strategy of addressing the problem at the level of financial institutions, rather than borrowers. Although the $24.4 billion plan she advocated to prevent 1.5 million foreclosures was not supported by the Bush White House or Treasury, it was essentially adopted by the Obama administration and became public policy.

Bair's leadership in getting the FDIC to insure all non-interest-bearing transaction account balances was key to keeping corporate cash within the banking system and preventing a deeper banking crisis. She also successfully advocated for raising the basic FDIC deposit insurance level from $100,000 to $250,000. Bair presided over the orderly liquidation of IndyMac Bank and was a key player in the megamergers of Washington Mutual with J.P. Morgan Chase and Wachovia Bank with Wells Fargo. She is now directing the FDIC's handling of a modest but growing list of small bank failures. Bair has won praise from Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives, for her independence, her common sense and her economical solutions for rescuing financial institutions.

CRISIS MANAGERS

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
America's first black president has shown both audacity in the amount of money committed to rescuing banks, the auto industry and the broader economy, and calm, but it is too early to tell how effective his policies will be.

TIMOTHY GEITHNER, SECRETARY, U.S. TREASURY
Going from New York Fed president to Treasury secretary was moving "out of the frying pan and into the fire" for Geithner, a key strategist of the financial bailouts and of stress tests for the biggest banks.

BEN BERNANKE, CHAIRMAN, U.S. FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD
Bernanke, who made his name at Princeton analyzing the Great Depression, has presided over some of the most interventionist and controversial Fed actions since 1913.

HENRY PAULSON, FORMER TREASURY SECRETARY, FORMER CHAIRMAN and CEO,GOLDMAN SACHS
Credited with getting Congress to support the emergency $700 billion bank bailout, Paulson has been criticized for lobbying as Goldman CEO in 2004 to end the net capital rule limiting investment bank leverage, a move that helped create the crisis.

PAUL VOLCKER, CHAIRMAN, WHITE HOUSE ECONOMIC RECOVERY ADVISORY BOARD
Volcker, the Fed chairman from 1979 through 1987, is no fan of the derivatives games that banks have been playing for the last two decades. He's probably the biggest advocate of tough banking regulation among Obama's key economic advisers.

JAMIE DIMON, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, J.P. MORGAN CHASE
Outspoken head of the nation's leading bank in terms of assets, Dimon has said he plans to use the bank's $25 billion of TARP money for acquisitions. He recently stunned the U.S. Chamber of Commerce by calling for more power for federal bank regulators.

SAVVY SAGES

WARREN BUFFETT, CHAIRMAN, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
Even the Oracle of Omaha got burned. After trash-talking derivatives as "weapons of wealth destruction," it turns out Berkshire Hathaway owned $675 million of credit risk. Buffett bet heavily on the bank bailout, buying 10% of Goldman Sachs and Wells Fargo.

NOURIEL ROUBINI, PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY'S STERN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Widely credited with predicting the financial crisis, Turkish-born Roubini said in 2005 that U.S. home prices were a bubble that was ready to pop and sink the economy. He continues to warn of a prolonged economic slump and a troubled banking system.

ROBERT SCHILLER, PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS, YALE UNIVERSITY
Schiller is credited with predicting the 2007 housing market peak and the subsequent plunge of global markets. He says derivatives are the solution to the crisis, not a cause.

JOSEPH STIGLITZ, NOBEL LAUREATE and PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
Former chief economist at the World Bank and a critic of "free market fundamentalism," Stiglitz has criticized the administration's bank bailouts, saying even the largest banks should be allowed to fail.

DIANE SWONK, CHIEF ECONOMIST, MESIROW FINANCIAL
Swonk is warning that the post-recession economy will be marked by more regulation, more austerity and a return of inflation. She sees the U.S. economy returning to modest growth in the second half.

NASSIM TALEB, PROFESSOR OF RISK ENGINEERING, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY'S POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
This former Wall Street derivatives trader coined the term "black swan" for unexpected events and has challenged the notion that risks can be mathematically predicted and mitigated.

DAVID WYSS, CHIEF ECONOMIST, STANDARD & POOR'S
One of the more optimistic forecasters, Wyss is predicting that the downturn will end in the third quarter and is forecasting that the U.S. economy will grow an estimated 0.8% in Q4.

CHANGE AGENTS

ED LIDDY, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP
With the U.S. government $170 billion in the hole over AIG, Liddy, the former CEO of Allstate, has had the Herculean task of salvaging the world's largest insurer.

BARRY SILBERT, CEO, SECONDMARKET
Seeing opportunity in adversity, Silbert created a brokerage firm specializing in illiquid toxic assets, such as auction-rate securities, and is finding success and fame as the new guru of illiquid assets.

JEFF SPRECHER, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, INTERCONTINENTALEXCHANGE (ICE)
Sprecher is set to play a central role in efforts to make derivatives trading safer and more transparent now that IntercontinentalExchange has stepped ahead of its bigger rival, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, and began centrally clearing the $38.6 trillion credit derivatives market in March.

MEREDITH WHITNEY, FOUNDER, MEREDITH WHITNEY ADVISORY GROUP
Another Cassandra of the credit crisis, Whitney, then an Oppenheimer & Co. analyst, shot to prominence last year when her extremely negative views on big banks panned out.

THE FINANCIAL C-SUITE

DAVID ANDERSON, SVP AND CFO, HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL
The foresight to optimize and automate treasury functions and a keen eye for managing the cost side of the business have allowed Anderson to keep Honeywell on an even keel throughout the crisis.

CHRIS BALLINGER, GROUP VP, FINANCE, MANAGEMENT SCIENCES AND GLOBAL TREASURY AND CFO,
TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES
Ballinger farsightedly diversified Toyota's funding sources, providing the company with a competitive advantage, and pushed a pre-crisis focus on risk and liquidity management that gave it more borrowing power.

PAUL BOWERS, EVP AND CFO, SOUTHERN COMPANY
A key player in the company's bid to adapt to changing energy needs, Bowers is engineering a $13.6 billion capital expansion (the largest in the company's history) to fund a variety of projects and studies that include nuclear, biomass and coal-to-gas conversion.

JEFF BURCHILL, SVP AND CFO, FM GLOBAL
Amid economic turbulence, Burchill's strategies on capital and liquidity have helped keep FM Global, one of the world's largest business property insurers, debt free, financially strong and very liquid.

CHRISTA DAVIES, EVP OF GLOBAL FINANCE AND CFO, AON
Taking the finance helm at Aon at the start of the financial crisis in March 2008, Davies managed the company's $2.75 billion divestiture of two major units and its acquisition of Benfield Group Ltd.

JEFF HENDERSON, EVP AND CFO, CARDINAL HEALTH
Canadian-born Henderson rebuilt a credible finance organization for $90 billion Cardinal after it underwent an SEC investigation and has helped rationalize Cardinal's portfolio of businesses.

PETER KELLOGG, EVP AND CFO, MERCK & CO.
Kellogg and his team use sophisticated risk management and treasury management techniques to keep on top of the pharmaceutical company's complex product portfolio and its global footprint.

HOLLY KOEPPEL, EVP AND CFO, AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER
Koeppel led the Ohio-based utility's successful offering of 60 million common shares earlier this year, then used the $1.69 billion raised in the offering to pare AEP's debt and bolster the funding of its pension plan.

CHRIS LIDDELL, CFO, MICROSOFT
Liddell led Microsoft's quick response to the economy's slump, in which the finance team identified $1.5 billion of 2009 savings. Now he's looking ahead to figure out how best to position the company for the post-recession economy.

KATHLEEN QUIRK, EVP, CFO AND TREASURER, FREEPORT MCMORAN COPPER & GOLD
Faced with $18.5 billion in debt from the company's 2007 acquisition of Phelps-Dodge, Quirk helped reduce that figure to a more manageable $7 billion by early 2009, bolstering the mining firm as it faces tough times as the global recession causes copper prices to swoon.

MARC ROSENBLUM, CFO, CLARINS USA
Rosenblum's concern for the welfare of the cosmetic company's U.S. employees led Clarins to offer an annuity product
to participants in the 401(k) plan that allows retirees to lock in a regular income stream.

TOM SCHOEWE, EVP AND CFO, WAL-MART STORES
Schoewe is one of just two CFOs of Dow industrial companies who managed to drive his company's stock value higher amid last year's faltering economy. His "Don't Borrow $2 Billion" program led Wal-Mart to reduce its dependence on debt before credit markets froze.

DAVID WYSHNER, EVP AND CFO, AVIS BUDGET GROUP
In an industry slammed by the slump in business and personal travel, soaring gas prices, tightened credit and, more recently, a crisis in the auto industry, Wyshner has managed to keep Avis Budget's debt in check and its credit lines open.

TREASURERS

MARSHALL BRIDGES, TREASURER AND VP, CORPORATE FINANCE, HNI CORP.
Bridges boosted the office furniture manufacturer's cash flow by negotiating extended terms with more than 10,000 suppliers to improve its days payable outstanding.

BRENT CALLINICOS, VP AND TREASURER, GOOGLE
When Callinicos left Microsoft to join rapidly growing Google, he set out to build one of the most technologically sophisticated treasuries in the world. He's well on his way. When the financial crisis hit, Google's state-of-the-art multi-billion-dollar FX risk management program was in place and working smoothly.

JENNIFER CERAN, VP AND TREASURER, EBAY
Last October, despite severely strained capital markets, Ceran was able to finance eBay's $995 million acquisition of Bill Me Later, thus preserving the company's more than $3 billion of cash. She also led eBay to its first set of public ratings--all strong investment-grade.

JOYA DE FOOR, CITY TREASURER, CITY OF LOS ANGELES
While overseeing the city's $7.5 billion investment fund, De Foor directed a total revamp of banking, technology and accounting processes throughout various city departments.

PHIL FRACASSA, SVP, TAX AND TREASURY, TIMKEN CO.
Fracassa has successfully managed the bearings manufacturer's liquidity amid difficult times and led the company's successful effort to win a ratings upgrade from Moody's in September 2008.

EDWARD LIEBERT, CHAIRMAN, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CORPORATE TREASURERS, AND TREASURER,
ROHM & HAAS
In his role as chairman of NACT, Liebert worked to focus public attention on the challenges involved in maintaining corporate liquidity as the credit markets faltered last year.

LORI MARIN, VP AND CORPORATE TREASURER, JOHNSONDIVERSEY
At the industrial cleaning service and supply company operating in 160 countries and facing rising raw materials costs and substantial debt from a major acquisition, Marin takes advantage of time zones to work multiple continents each day to develop liquidity sources off the beaten track.

RICK MOSS, SVP AND TREASURER, HANESBRANDS
Moss managed the capital markets and financing aspects of Hanesbrands' spin-off from Sara Lee. Then he built a new treasury group from scratch and has been guiding the highly leveraged company through the worst banking crisis in decades, working deftly with lenders to keep liquidity flowing.

JOANNA OLIVA, VP AND TREASURER, FLUOR CORP.
Oliva and Fluor's treasury team spotted the looming credit crunch early and began to build liquidity and expand credit capacity in 2006 to position the global construction company for the new credit environment.

CHRIS PAGANO, EVP, TREASURER AND CHIEF INVESTMENT OFFICER, ASSURANT
Moving to reduce the specialty insurer's portfolio risk in 2007 and 2008, Pagano eliminated subprime and CDO holdings and reduced preferred stock exposure 30%.

NEIL SCHLOSS, VP AND TREASURER, FORD MOTOR
Schloss has helped the lone standout in the auto industry's meltdown use every tool in the garage--bond and stock issues, deep-discount buybacks, debt-for-equity swaps and union negotiations--to build liquidity that, at least for now, lets Ford control its destiny. (See cover story.)

SUSAN STALNECKER, VP AND TREASURER, DUPONT
After working her way up through the ranks at DuPont, Stalnecker heads a treasury that is efficient, high-tech and very responsive to the needs of business units, many of which she has worked in.

DENNIS SWEENEY, DEPUTY TREASURER, GENERAL ELECTRIC
Sweeney keeps GE on the cutting edge of bank/corporate communication. He is the leading advocate of direct corporate access to SWIFT, a driving force behind the new TWIST standard for invoicing bank services, and is putting GE's weight behind a project to digitize bank account administration.

BRIAN SZAMES, TREASURER, MACY'S
As the retail sector reeled, Szames enhanced Macy's liquidity with a June 2008 bond issue, improvements to working capital and changes to the covenants on the company's revolving credit facility.

JOHN TUS, VP AND TREASURER, HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL
An unstinting focus on global cash management and liquidity, a push to consolidate global banking relationships and the ability to quickly create a blueprint for integrating acquisitions have made Tus and his team exemplars of best practices and two-time overall Alexander Hamilton Awards winners.

ROBERT YENKO, ASSISTANT TREASURER, INTEL
Yenko helps Intel thrive in a complex and volatile global economy by finding ways to reduce risk and improve yields on cash trapped in Asia. He also ran a fixed-income portfolio for Intel that grew from $300 million to $2.5 billion.

GEORGE ZINN, TREASURER, MICROSOFT
Zinn steered Microsoft's $25 billion cash flotilla safely through troubled investment waters--all auction-rate and asset-backed paper was unloaded before the storm hit and the return remained positive. Then he introduced gilt-edged Microsoft (A1+/AAA) to the commercial paper and debt markets.

CONTROLLERS AND CAOS

JONATHAN CHADWICK, SVP, CORPORATE CONTROLLER AND PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING OFFICER, CISCO SYSTEMS
Chadwick, who was named controller after a five-year stint running Cisco's corporate finance and planning group, has transformed the role from an accounting function to a key player in business strategy just as the company, with $30 billion in cash, embarks on an acquisition program.

JASON GROSS, VP, CONTROLS MANAGEMENT, SIEMENS FINANCIAL SERVICES INC.
Gross has pushed the role of internal audit at Siemens Financial to a new level by transforming the department into an adviser on issues of risk assurance.

ARNOLD HANISH, VP OF FINANCE AND CHIEF ACCOUNTING OFFICER, ELI LILLY & CO.
As head of Financial Executives International's corporate reporting committee, Hanish played a key role in pushing for flexibility in the adoption of fair-value reporting. He has also been active in pressing the SEC to adopt a firm deadline for converting to international financial reporting standards.

JIM KROEKER, ACTING CHIEF ACCOUNTANT, U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
As deputy chief accountant, Kroeker directed an SEC study last fall that led the commission to reject bank industry efforts to suspend market-to-market accounting rules, and in his new post he appears to remain opposed to efforts to weaken that standard.

JAMIE MILLER, VP AND CONTROLLER, GENERAL ELECTRIC
Miller's leadership ability and technical skills are being put to good use in her role heading up GE's global controllership, a force of approximately 3,500 accountants.

AMANDA NEVINS, VP OF FINANCE AND CHIEF ACCOUNTING OFFICER, ZAPPOS.COM
Nevins built accounting, finance and treasury organizations from scratch for the rapidly growing online shoe store. And last year, she made a number of moves to improve Zappos.com's liquidity, including negotiating higher credit lines from vendors.

BANKERS

DONALD BERK, SVP AND HEAD OF PRODUCT MANAGEMENT, TREASURY MANAGEMENT SERVICES,
NORTHERN TRUST
In charge of U.S. commercial banking, international banking and personal finance services, Berk is developing Northern Trust's strategy to ensure that global banking solutions address regional compliance requirements. He leads the effort to integrate U.S. and global funds transfer systems to allow seamless clearing and processing.

CATHERINE BESSANT, PRESIDENT OF GLOBAL PRODUCT SOLUTIONS, BANK OF AMERICA
Bessant leads the global treasury services and credit operations at Bank of America and is orchestrating the expanded international reach of the businesses following the bank's acquisition of Merrill Lynch.

ROBERT EDWARDS, COO AND EVP, PNC TREASURY MANAGEMENT
Under Edwards' direction, PNC customized its electronic billing and payment technology and launched a new brand, PNC Healthcare. He also guided its card services strategy to double-digit revenue growth and oversees the business's compliance and risk management.

DAVID FULLER, EVP, HEAD OF CORE COMMERCIAL EXECUTIVE AND TREASURY AND PAYMENT
SOLUTIONS DIVISION, SUNTRUST
Fuller helped launch Enterprise Spend Platform, a commercial card management solution that gives organizations greater control over compliance and spending on travel and entertainment, procurement and payables. He has led the effort to bring all business clients onto one online platform.

ERIC KAMBACK, CEO, TREASURY SERVICES GROUP, BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON
Under Kamback's leadership, key product and market initiatives executed by Treasury Services have helped to shape the bank's approach to global markets and business opportunities worldwide. He has driven substantial client expansion in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas.

DANIEL MAROVITZ, HEAD OF PRODUCT MANAGEMENT, GLOBAL TRANSACTION BANKING, DEUTSCHE BANK
Leading product innovation for Deutsche Bank's trade finance and cash management services, Marovitz has extended the bank's cash management offering with the launch of Deutsche Card Services and a recent partnership for mobile phone payments services.

MELISSA MOORE, EVP AND CEO, J.P. MORGAN TREASURY SERVICES
Moore has played a critical role in helping the bank maintain its leadership position in the current economic crisis, resulting in Treasury Services delivering record-setting firm-wide net revenue of $6.5 billion in 2008, a 15% increase from the previous year.

DANNY PELTZ, EVP AND HEAD OF TREASURY MANAGEMENT GROUP, WELLS FARGO
Recognized as a leader in the paper-to-electronic revolution, Peltz now heads a team of 1,500 strong servicing Wells Fargo's corporate and commercial customers after the merger with Wachovia, another top cash management provider.

PAUL SIMPSON, GLOBAL HEAD OF TREASURY AND TRADE SOLUTIONS, CITIGROUP
Succeeding Vanni d'Archirafi as head of the largest GTS group, Simpson previously led multiple global GTS businesses, including the commercial cards business, which chalked up 20% growth in revenue since 2008, and oversaw a global expansion in Citi's pre-paid business.

WERNER STEINMUELLER, HEAD OF GLOBAL TRANSACTION BANKING, DEUTSCHE BANK
Under Steinmueller's direction, Deutsche Bank has served as a safe harbor for clients' assets and payment processing activities. A champion of SEPA and other industry initiatives, he oversees strategic geographic and network expansion across developing markets in Asia, Europe and Latin America.

DAVID TROTTER, HEAD OF TREASURY MANAGEMENT SALES, WELLS FARGO
Formerly head of treasury services for Wachovia, the customer-focused Trotter is providing the leadership needed to create a sales team that reflects the combined strengths of each legacy organization.

FRANCESCO VANNI D'ARCHIRAFI, CEO, GLOBAL TRANSACTION SERVICES (GTS), CITIGROUP
Known as a catalyst for innovation, Vanni d'Archirafi and his previous treasury and trade solutions group delivered $6.4 billion in revenue in 2008. He oversees a business operating in more than 100 countries and processing more than $3 trillion in payment flows daily.

SUSAN WEBB, EVP AND PRODUCT EXECUTIVE, GLOBAL CORE CASH MANAGEMENT, J.P. MORGAN
TREASURY SERVICES
Webb plays a pivotal role in the evolution of the payments space. Under her leadership, J.P. Morgan again ranked first in ACH originations last year, with more than 3.5 billion ACH transactions in 2008.

DEALMAKERS

FELIPE DUTRA, CFO, ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV
Dutra managed to come up with financing for InBev's $52 billion purchase of Anheuser-Busch last year despite the credit market tightening.

LARRY ELLISON, CEO, ORACLE.
Silicon Valley legend Ellison's Oracle won Sun Microsystems for $7.4 billion. The deal gives Oracle Sun's Java open source development platform, Solaris operating system and MySQL open source database software, and promises to deliver end-to-end solutions, cutting integrating costs.

JEFF KINDLER, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, PFIZER
The $68 billion megamerger that Kindler engineered with Wyeth will plug the holes in Pfizer's product lineup and move the combined organization into the ranks of the largest U.S. corporations.

JOE PLUMERI, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, WILLIS GROUP HOLDINGS
Plumeri's acquisition of Hilb Rogal & Hobbs boosted insurance broker Willis' revenue, moving it closer in size and heft to competitors Marsh and Aon, and positions Willis to grow in the middle market.

RISK MANAGEMENT

PETE FAHRENTHOLD, MANAGING DIRECTOR, RISK MANAGEMENT, CONTINENTAL AIRLINES
Fahrenthold heads the ERM team at Continental, which carried approximately 69 million passengers last year. As insurers ran into problems last year, he undertook extensive research into the health of the insurance companies that provide Continental's coverage.

FRANK FIORILLE, DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGEMENT, PAYCHEX
Fiorille devised a risk intelligence system that boosts annual revenue $40 million by using risk to create value as well as preserve it. The ERM organization that he built and runs manages all risk, including credit risk, on a portfolio of $250 billion and throughput of more than $500 billion.

MARIE HOLLEIN, CEO, FINANCIAL EXECUTIVES INTERNATIONAL
Hollein, a former KPMG consultant, brings her treasury and risk management expertise to FEI as its members face unprecedented challenges. FEI has responded with measures ranging from networking meetings for members in transition to a new committee focusing on the concerns of treasurers.

J. STEPHEN MCNALLY, FINANCE DIRECTOR AND CONTROLLER, NAPOLEON OPERATIONS, CAMPBELL SOUP
McNally has played an important role in the consumer products company's work on internal controls. He built the company's structure for assessing company-level controls, led its effort to meet Sarbanes-Oxley requirements and worked with a team to launch the company's Control Self-Assessment program.

JOSEPH RESTOULE, PRESIDENT, RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY; LEADER OF RISK MANAGEMENT, NOVA CHEMICALS
Restoule employs his enthusiasm about risk management to promote the importance of the work and challenge other risk practitioners to embrace innovative methods of managing risk.

LUKE SAVAGE, DIRECTOR OF FINANCE, RISK MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS, LLOYD'S OF LONDON
In a tough year for the insurance industry, Savage has managed a successful debt buyback and helped the company turn a $2.7 billion profit. CEO Richard Ward credits Savage with helping the British insurer build up capital to weather the current crisis.

WARD SAX, VP, CHIEF RISK OFFICER AND TREASURER, RTI
RTI's mission: conduct research into how to save the planet. Sax's mission: ensure that a wide range of global risks don't knock RTI off track. He is a pioneer in enterprise risk management, pulling together the views of 31 key risk stakeholders.

TECHNOLOGY

LARRY BOYER, CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER, TREASURY, DUPONT
Boyer is at the leading edge of integrating treasury with information sources. He helped DuPont save an estimated $2.5 million by forging a direct connection to SWIFT, a project with 203% ROI. He also consolidated a dispersed treasury organization into just two trading centers.

CHRIS CHURCH, CEO FOR THE AMERICAS, SWIFT
As plugging into multiple banks through one connection becomes more important to corporations trying to reduce costs and automate their treasury operations, shared market infrastructure veteran Church aims to make it easy for companies of all sizes to use SWIFT.

COURTLANDT GATES, CEO, CLEARWATER ANALYTICS
As treasurers' and CFOs' concerns about short-term investments intensified, Gates and his team stepped forward with Clearwater's Web-based reporting and analytics platform, which increases portfolio transparency and has been integrated into a number of bank platforms.

CHRIS LEONE, GROUP VP, FUSION AND GRC APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT, ORACLE
Leone oversaw last fall's release of the ERP firm's latest GRC platform, which features environmental management systems designed to help companies comply with new sustainable business standards.

JIRO OKOCHI, CEO, REVAL
Okochi's Reval had a hit last year when its 157 Solution proved invaluable in treasurers' efforts to comply with FAS 157, the fair-value accounting standard.

BOB RICHARDSON, PRESIDENT AND CEO, FXPRESS CORP.
Richardson led the treasury technology company to a third consecutive year of record growth as the success of its Web-based treasury management system, FIRST, produced a 34% surge in FXpress's revenues.

JEAN-LUC ROBERT, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, KYRIBA
Robert and Kyriba racked up a string of almost 100 new clients last year as the company's ASP treasury management solution, TI, took the market by storm.

NARINA SIPPY, SVP AND GENERAL MANAGER, GRC GROUP, SAP
Sippy heads up the governance, risk and compliance area at SAP, currently the biggest provider of such software, and is also a leader in financial technology efforts generally at the ERP giant.

HARALD WILL, PRESIDENT AND CEO, ACL SERVICES
Will has led Vancouver-based ACL's evolution into a global provider of internal audit software and continuous controls monitoring solutions.

REGULATORS

DAVID BLASZKOWSKY, DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF INTERACTIVE DISCLOSURE, U.S. SECURITIES AND
EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Blaszkowsky is on the front lines of efforts to transform financial reporting by mandating the use of XBRL so that companies' financial results are easier to analyze and compare.

ERIC DINALLO, NEW YORK STATE INSURANCE SUPERINTENDENT
As the top insurance regulator in the financial capital of the United States, Dinallo has worked closely with key insurers to stabilize the industry in the wake of the American International Group debacle.

WILLIAM DUDLEY, PRESIDENT AND CEO, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF NEW YORK
Dudley will have to keep his fire extinguisher handy in his new job as Timothy Geithner's successor at the helm of the New York Fed, the regulator that provides the closest monitoring of the nation's megabanks.

BOB HERZ, CHAIRMAN, FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD
Herz and FASB were in the center of the storm when the board reconsidered its mark-to-market regulations, and they're likely to see more controversy in coming years as they work to converge U.S. and international accounting standards.

J. MARK IWRY, SENIOR ADVISOR TO THE SECRETARY OF THE U.S. TREASURY AND DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR RETIREMENT AND HEALTH-CARE POLICY, U.S. TREASURY
Iwry, a proponent of extending the 401(k) system to reach more workers, will have the ability to influence government retirement policy in his new role as the Treasury's pension adviser.

SIR DAVID TWEEDIE, CHAIR, INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD
Among the challenges facing U.S. corporations is the move to converge U.S. accounting standards with those on the other side of the Atlantic, a process in which Tweedie will have a huge role going forward.

ELIZABETH WARREN, CHAIR OF THE CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT PANEL CREATED TO OVERSEE
THE U.S. BANKING BAILOUT
Warren, a Harvard Law School professor, has voiced her criticisms of the bailout's cost and transparency in venues ranging from congressional testimony to television talk shows.

NOUT WELLINK, CHAIRMAN, BASEL COMMITTEE ON BANKING SUPERVISION
Wellink and the Basel Committee are in the midst of a massive overhaul of banking industry regulations that will have a big impact on banks, and through them, the global economy.

EDWARD YINGLING, CEO, AMERICAN BANKERS ASSOCIATION
The adjustments to mark-to-market regulations earlier this year are generally credited to the lobbying clout of the banking industry, as exemplified by Yingling and the ABA.

POLITICIANS

U.S. SEN. MAX BAUCUS (D-MONT.), CHAIRMAN, SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE
Baucus is driving the effort to reform U.S. healthcare. Since releasing a white paper on the topic last fall, he has worked closely with the Obama administration to produce a health reform package.

U.S. REP. BARNEY FRANK (D-MASS.), CHAIRMAN, HOUSE FINANCIAL SERVICES COMMITTEE
Widely considered one of the most powerful members of Congress, Frank played a crucial role both in reducing Treasury's power in handling the $700-billion financial bailout proposed by then-Treasurer Henry Paulson and in winning congressional support for the bailout.

U.S. SEN. CHARLES GRASSLEY (R-IOWA), RANKING MEMBER, SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE
While he later claimed it was "just rhetoric," Grassley famously suggested executives at AIG should follow Japanese executives' example and either "resign or commit suicide." Something of a GOP maverick, he could be open to a compromise on Obama's public insurance option.

U.S. REP. GEORGE MILLER (D-CALIF.), CHAIRMAN, HOUSE EDUCATION AND LABOR COMMITTEE
A key player in any effort to shore up Social Security and Medicare and bolster worker retirement savings, Miller is also a key advocate of the Employee Free Choice Act, which has been bitterly opposed by business lobbies.

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